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is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news and there's enough bad news in the world and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests, those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such a potential disaster, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don't have any high ground to go to in this where we have 6 bill
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> hello, everybody. i'm melisilissa rehberger. wall street will be back in business tomorrow. they will reopen wednesday after hurricane sandy shut down trading for two days. the organizers of the new york city marathon say they are going ahead with sunday's race despite the damage caused by sandy. meanwhile, ubs announced it will cut up to 10,000 jobs by 2015. they say they're tryin
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> governor christie throughout this process has been responsive. he's been aggressive in making sure that the state got out in front of this incredible storm. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and the people of our state. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie standing together side by side surveying the damage from hurricane sandy. they have gone from adversaries to praising each other. my guest michael moore. we did cover the rockaway blaze in the midnight show on monday night in to tuesday morning. i was anchoring that toward the end. we were one of the first networks to get it on the air. >> but two or three hours after it happened. my point is, can you imagine if 110 homes were burning right now in los angeles? >> sure. >> it would be another three hours we heard about it. >> no. but you have to take it in the context of everything else going on in new york. >> my point is that everything going on wa
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
have climate problem. and majority of americans believe in science. we have allowed the ignore ray mouses run the show on this and this should put an end to that. >> could it be that they have been measuring weather since 1898, could it be a global cyclical weather thing, actually not global warming but something that may have happened 500, 1,000 years ago you get pockets of this and we don't have the records to back it up. could it be that. >> i will answer it the way mayor bloomberg answered it, it could be that but do you want to take a risk? what if you are wrong? we are not prepared like we weren't prepared for this and we won't be prepared for the next thing and we weren't prepare fdr the drought this summer. how many times do we get punched in the face before we realize, something is punch me in the face. >> chad, you have been in the game nearly three decades, is this global warming we are seeing from a meteorological point of view, is there any other explanation. >> it's the prime suspect. i don't have one. maybe particulates in the air. the rain drops, the moisture can ge
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
. >>> the final home of the space shuttle endeavour is open to the public. opening up the california science center in l.a. it features videos, and artifacts from endeavour and the artifact, the shuttle itself. >>> the wizards fourth-quarter comeback falling short. the team's reaction is up next. >> now -- [ indiscernible ] >> yo. >> where is my chicken nuggets! >> ya. >> halloween prankster, a zombie decided to trick young workers at the drive-thru. and the man rears and lunges out terrify -- roars and lunges out terrifying teenagers. teen . >>> the until is still reviewing deangelo hall's outburst with the officials on sunday. a decision is expected tonight or tomorrow. the commissioner said in a radio interview today that the league has very strong rules in the areas of sportsmanship and respect for officials and they will enforce them a grill. -- aggressively. we're not only waiting word on hall but waiting for the recovery of merryweather. the safety has yet to play in a game this year and is hampered by a spring ligament in the left knee since the spring season. reaggravateed twice, in
there is some science around it because the yoga produces collagen. >> you'll have a beneficial effect. >> experts say there are techniques involved. demand is growing in new york. classes are devoted simply to mastering this form of yoga. >>> a woman assaulted while jogging in fells point. we're live at police headquarters. that story and more coming up on abc2 news at 6, which starts right now. >>> three water main breaks in
. our site is doing it because their cars get keyed and science get torn down. >> hi, my name is harry. i love your passion and your honesty all these years. i've seen you on media. and david, i admire him so deeply. mainly for that day she was going be campuses and taking them on right there in those places. i was a student in 1965 at kersten university and i was drawn by democrats into democrats into wanting to help take care of people are hearing the clarence thomas hearings, i switched to republican. the >> that's great. >> after the republicans inability to prosecute clinton all the way, i let them and became an independent and decided that was the best place i could find. i loved what you said about the courage of the black conservative. that's the subject i've been drawn to from the very beginning. it was in my heart in those days as a student, when i was in the march to montgomery, where it all got started. >> is this leading to question? >> i have value of my own, too. i wanted you to comment on the person of thomas soul if you don't mind. [applause] >> i think is the greatest
-- >> jennifer: that's the language of science right? >> it isn't really. much of science isn't like that. like anything that i just mentioned about biology economics and so on. but climate scientists are using that incorrectly. there is real systemic causation here. and systemic causation happens when certain things are present. for example you might have multiple causes. you might have a network of causes. you might have feedback groups. all of those really occur in nature. and what happens here is very clear. in hurricane sandy you have a special kind of hurricane that is normal. actually when you have global warming. it is normal because its characterization is it's huge. it has a huge amount of moisture. it has a huge amount of energy that goes into the winds. how does this happen? every climate scientist knows perfectly well that when you have global warming you get more evaporation over the oceans lots more moisture in the air. when that happens you get heat in the oceans. heat transfers in storms into wind
] [ crowd chants u.s.a. ] >> cenk: i love that reaction. hey, what about climate science? u.s.a.! u.s.a.! we're number one! ha ha, take that, climate change. luckily, not everybody's that dense. new cover of business week is it's global warming stupid. we now have the author of that article, assistant managing editor of bloomberg business week joining us now. some believe this cover story is a bit controversial. do you believe it is? >> no, obviously the cover language is meant to get people's attention but if you read the story itself, you see we're playing it right down the middle. the issue here is not to blame climate change for any one particular storm but to say that the conditions in the atmosphere have indisputably changed and as a result of those changes, all storms generally speaking are going to be prone to be more severe and more frequent and we are beginning to see in undeniable terms the price of the warming of the atmosphere, the warming of the ocean waters and the rise of the ocean waters. >> cenk: paul, here's the problem with that. you say it's undeniable, all the scientist
. with advances in science and technology, there's -- health of the mother has been -- has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one's ever died in childbirth, i know what the science is exactly. what to you make of it with these claims now this shouldn't be an exception for life or health of the mother which we know most people honor those exceptions. >> they're simply not true. i thing he's been going to the todd akin school of biology. 1 in 40 pregnancies, women have pre-eclampsia. there are a number of reasons. but the point is this is not what this district is. this is a moderate district of hardworking people, and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodies. and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you so much for coming on "hardball." good luck next week. >>> when we return, let me finish with a word of warning about mitt romney's transformation in the last couple days, you know, to moderate. >>> let me finish tonight with this. it's
the whole man here, you're the senior science journalist for the "huffington post." okay, we we could put walls up, but shouldn't we go to the source of the problem fossil fuels. >> you have to mitigate the effects because in some respects it is a little too late to reverse this problem. but you also want to work as hard as you can to stop it from getting any worse. we can talk about this kind of two degree celsius problem, and we can get to the technical stuff. but the truth is it's already gotten so bad and even if we stopped putting emissions in the atmosphere it will still get worse for many, many years. >> cenk: let's talk about that for a minute. we have thisthere is magical reverse when we need it. it seems that that would be the time. >> they're saying, the scientists will do all that. >> cenk: seriously is there a way to reverse it. >> to reverse climate change? >> cenk: it just times. >> it a function of making sure it doesn't get worse. we are we at that level. >> cenk: that was a hard-hitting ad against mitt romney against climate change. should democrats--that was an outside
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are you one of them? drink dream water, the natural, fast acting sleep aid that helps you wake refreshed. visit drinkdreamwater.com. >>> there is no electricity. people are living in shacks. growing up here makes you feel like you don't have control over your life. many children drop out of school, because they don't have school uniforms and textbooks. i realized that the only way that this area could change is through education. i'm tulani montondo. i'm helping children so we can change the community together. we help the children by paying for school books, school uniforms. our main focus is a tutoring program we run four days a week. as young people who were born and raised here, we know the challenges of the community. we come together for fun and come together for academics. >> it gives me a chance to go to the university. they are trying to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not
as health of the mother, same thing with the science of technology, health of the mother has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one that has ever died in child birth. i don't know what the science is. what do you make of the claims and most people are. >> that's not true. he's been going to the todd akin school of biology, to be honest. in fact, one in 40 pregnancies are he can topic pregnancy where the fertilize tube and results in the loss of the fetus if you don't -- to save the life of the mother. women who have cancer and need chemotherapy, there's a number of reasons. but the point is, this is not where this district is. it's a moderate district of hardworking people and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodieses and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you. >>> when we return, mitt romney's amazing transformation, you know, to moderate. you're watching "hardball," a place for politics. ♪ this will literally probably never happen
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
a superstorm. >> you mentioned that the sea ice in greenland is gone. melded. >> do you believe that science is -- >> absolutely. >> what do you say to them? >> these are the same people that say that adam and eve road on doinosaurs. let's say that maybe you are right, but do you want to take the chance that maybe you are not right. what is the harm in preparing or changing our way of life so that we don't dose trestroy the plan. if they are going to want the same thing that we have had and that -- gentleman choh chad. thank you very much. we are going to talk to mike about voter turnout. you want americans to vote and you explain why. [ male announcer ] do you have the legal protection you need? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy with step-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom help
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
apolitical science professor about what could be done. >> reporter: modern democracy uses machines that require electricity to record individual votes and then high- speed computer internet connections to transmit total counts to central election officials. but there may not be electricity even in parts of new york city for next tuesday's scheduled election. rural areas could face even longer delays on power. election officials across the northeast are scrambling discussing whether it is possible to consolidate polling places, use portable generate ours or have some vote by hand the old-fashioned way. what only a few are discussing publicly is any delay in the presidential election, something that has never happened before and here is why. >> i think it would probably take an act of congress to change that and allow states to have the flexibility to do so. the question is would they give individual states the flexibility to change their dates and delay it for a week or even two weeks. >> very unlikely. >> very unlikely, i think that is right. >> wayne stagger says that since most o
. as they crisscrossed the country, on this, the final friday. >> there is a science to this last-minute stumping. four men, four states. a chance of four more days instead of four more years, mitt romney has put the badger state in play. >> thanks to ann romney -- next to ann romney, paul ryan is the best choice i have ever made. >> with these guys, it always depends. who you're talking to. what state you are in. >> how about ohio? that is for the president spoke three times to dead. remember every president since truman has upheld the bellwether state. >> we may have had problems, but we are here today because we know we have more work to do. >> with a hefty 18 electoral votes up for grabs, romney has two events there today. colorado, also a tough one for republicans, and it was seen in obama's column. but romney is up three according to a rasmussen paul. and both teams have fought incredibly hard over d six electoral votes. perhaps an indicator that even the smallest trophy cannot be passed up. of course, va. -- it has been 24 hours since we have seen the candidates. don't worry. the president, with
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 164 (some duplicates have been removed)

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